University Honors College - The Honorable mention
Thursday
01/19/17

Spring 2017 Art Courses for Non-Majors

Posted by Tim on January 19, 2017 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

ART 223LAB Figure Drawing 1

Art   TR 9:00-11:30  CFA 208 Joan Linder  3 credit hours  Beginner class

Uncover the transient and internal in a series of sessions that refines memory, facilitates speed, hones powers of perception and expression, all inspired by nothing less than the eternal nude. Gesture, spirit, memory, motion, essence, speed, measure, pace, balance, focus, weight, gravity, rhythm are all filters through which we examine and express human form. Technical experimentation is essential. There may be a class fee assessed to your student account.

ART 231LAB Painting Non Major 1

Art  MW 3:15-4:45  CFA 203 Pam Glick 3 credit hours  Beginner class

There is a fee associated with this class. For students not singularly committed to becoming artists. We learn a basic approach to oil painting and experience a variety of visual points of view.

AHI 347LEC African American Art

Art History   MW 2:00-3:20  CFA 146  Ted Triandos  3 credit hours  No AHI experience necessary

Investigates the different forms of African American visual artistic traditions in relation to their historical origins and sociocultural context from the early days of slavery to the present time. Starts with an overview of African art, the experiences of the middle passage, and slavery in relation to African American traditions in the decorative arts, including pottery, architecture, ironwork, quilt-making, and basketry. This is followed by a fine-art survey starting with the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, continuing through early twentieth-century Harlem Renaissance up to the present. Also explores certain issues related to African American arts and creativity, such as improvisation, Black aesthetic, Pan Africanism, and gender. Slides, films, and videos are used extensively to illustrate topics discussed in class.

AHI 364LEC American Realisms

Art History  T 6:00-8:40  CFA 118  Matthew Ballou 3 credit hours  No AHI experience necessary

Begins with an introduction to European realism and a discussion of its adaptation to an American context during the final quarter of the nineteenth century. The course then denaturalizes Realism’s ties with objectivity, explaining the movement as one in a series of subjective strategies for ordering one’s relation to the world. Focusing then on several discrete artistic movements, the course considers the changing cultural functions of “the real”, ranging from the early nineteenth through the late twentieth centuries. Movements to be addressed include romanticism, sentimentality, naturalism, impressionism, urban realism, regionalism, abstract expressionism, neo-realism, and photorealism.

AHI 395LEC Contemporary Art

Art History   MW 11:00-12:20  NSC 216  Jasmina Tumbas  3 credit hours (Pathway courseNo AHI experience necessary

Art of contemporary life; art criticism; art and politics; art in the media; pop and minimal art; conceptual art, earthworks, realism, feminist art, and performance. Requires attendance at events and exhibitions at local galleries.

AHI 404 Modern Arab and Islamic Art

Art History  W 4:00-6:40  Barren Golonu 3 credit hours  No AHI experience necessary

Investigates the different forms of Modern Arab and Islamic art.

Tuesday
11/22/16

LAI 301: Composing in the Human Sciences Spring 2017

Posted by Tim on November 22, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

LAI 301: Composing in the Human Sciences
3 Sections available Spring 2017

Also fulfills Communication Literacy 2

CL2 is designed to engage in exploring various composition processes, genres, and modalities that underlie skilled communication practices and consider larger issues of what it means to be communicatively literate in the digital, global world. We will explore a number of ways in which humans communicate in career and workplace literacies. Serves students who are studying and preparing for careers in the Human Sciences and Applied Human Sciences which may include those in academic and professional training in social work, psychology, education, media, law, industry, commerce, computing, management, health services, sociology, anthropology, and teaching. The human sciences emphasize the effects of disciplinary self-conceptions on what counts as knowledge and evidence in inquiries into
human beings and how they function together in social groups.

For more information, please contact Suzanne Miller at smiller@buffalo.edu

Monday
11/14/16

Math 101- Introduction to Contemporary Mathematics

Posted by Tim on November 14, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements

Course Description

———————–

This course is intended for students who do not plan to major in mathematics, science or engineering programs, which require calculus courses. The aim of this course is to expose students to the utility and beauty of mathematics, and strengthen their quantitative and analytical skills. The material is organized as a series of independent modules exploring various topics in modern mathematics, its real-world applications, and directions of current research. Topics of the modules are selected at the discretion of the course instructor.

This course fulfills the Math and Quantitative Reasoning requirement of the UB Curriculum.

 Course Prerequisites: successful completion of 3 full years of high school mathematics, including algebra.

Wednesday
11/09/16

APY 323 Anthropology and Education Spring 2017

Posted by Tim on November 9, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

Spring 2017

APY323 Anthropology and Education

Professor Reed-Danahay

Mondays and Wednesdays 3:30 to 4:50

O’Brian 109

This course takes a global perspective on human teaching and learning in a variety of cultural contexts. We explore ethnographic methods in educational research and anthropological approaches to education in its widest sense, both in and out of schools. Such forms of socialization as apprenticeship and initiation will be placed alongside of the formal educational institutions of North American and European nations. This course will also address the educational issues facing immigrants and minority populations in contemporary societies. Issues of gender, ethnicity, and social class will be discussed. Readings and discussion will emphasize research and practice. We will work with various qualitative methods, including autoethnography, and will also explore depictions of teachers and students in both ethnographic and feature films. There are no prerequisites.

*This course fulfill the Diversity requirement in the UB Curriculum.

Tuesday
10/25/16

Winter Social Work Electives Open to Undergraduates

Posted by Tim on October 25, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements, Online Courses, Registration and Seminar Information, Research Information and Opportunities, Winter Session

Winter Social Work Electives Open to Undergraduates

We are offering a number of winter Social Work undergraduate electives. Register as normal, but if you have questions, please contact our Registrar, Kathy Dmochowski at kgd2@buffalo.edu or 716-645-1273.

***For questions about whether this course will count towards your university requirements, please speak to your advisor.***

SW 115 Mental Health in Popular Culture and Media

The purpose of this course is to critically examine how individuals with mental health disorders and their families are portrayed in, and often stigmatized by popular culture and diverse forms of media, including broadcast, various film genres, video games, print media, and social media. Students will also explore how media can be used to reduce the stigmatization and marginalization of people with mental health disorders.

Location: Online
Credit Hours: 2
Registration # 10279
Instructor: Rebecca Polmanteer

SW 120 Who Do You Think You Are?

Have you ever wondered why you think the way you do? Have you ever wondered why you immediately connect, or not, with certain people? Have you ever thought about how this will impact your future in regards to both your personal friendships and professional relationships? This class will assist you in beginning the journey of understanding how it is you came to be who you are and how you came to think the way you do by examining the impact that your family has had and continues to have on you.

Course Dates: Saturday 1/7/17 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Saturday 1/14 & 1/21/17 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Location: 209 Norton Hall
Credit Hours: 2
Registration # 10188
Instructor: Glenn Frost

SW 401AON Your Brilliant Career: Using Social Media for Career Enhancement

Are you looking for a new tool to help you in your job search? Have you wondered how you may use social media to help you advance your career? This course will provide you with both knowledge and hands-on experience to build a strategic, professional presence via social media that will help you learn about new developments in your area of interest, establish your expertise and build your career.

Location: Online
Credit Hours: 1
Registration # 10281
Instructor: Dorlee Michaeli

SW 401BON Minecraft Play Therapy Intensive

Play therapy in the 21 century has gone both global and digital! Last year, the video game Minecraft had over 100 million registered users, of all ages, races, genders and socioeconomic status. Combining elements of sandbox games, MMOs and First-person shooters, this video game has won over gamers, educators and designers alike. And now social workers can harness the power of this game as a therapeutic tool. But did you know that Minecraft has a lot to teach us about how we pay attention to, get distracted from, and cope with things Embedded in the design and the lore of the game are nuggets of philosophy, neuroscience, and psychology. From work/life balance to physical and mental health to the meaning of life Minecraft has something to teach us. This session will investigate the nature of mind as illustrated by Minecraft, its different versions, and content. Drawing from CBT, DBT, psychodynamic theory and Theory of Mind, we’ll take a look at how this game creates a mediated environment for relationship, examples of affect regulation, and points the way toward deeper mindfulness and well-being.

Location: Online
Credit Hours: 1
Registration # 10282
Instructor: Michael Langlois

 

 

 

Tuesday
05/17/16

LAI 301: Composing in the Human Sciences Fall 2016

Posted by Tim on May 17, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

3 sections:

Tues-Thurs @ 11 AM

Tues-Thurs @ 2PM

Online Communication Literacy II

CL2 is designed to engage in exploring various composition processes, genres, and modalities that underlie skilled communication practices and consider larger issues of what it means to be communicatively literate in the digital, global world. We will explore a number of ways in which humans communicate in career and workplace literacies. Serves students who are studying and preparing for careers in the Human Sciences and Applied Human Sciences which may include those in academic and professional training in social work, psychology, education, media, law, industry, commerce, computing, management, health services, sociology, anthropology, and teaching. The human sciences emphasize the effects of disciplinary self-conceptions on what counts as knowledge and evidence in inquiries into human beings and how they function together in social groups.

For more information, please contact Suzanne Miller at smiller@buffalo.edu

Meets the undergraduate requirement for a Communication Literacy II course

Wednesday
04/27/16

Summer 2016 Anthropology Courses

Posted by Tim on April 27, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements, Summer Courses

APY106: INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY
July 11—August 19, 2016
Mondays and Wednesdays 9:00am-12:10pm
This course introduces students to the central concepts and questions of cultural anthropology as well as patterns of human cultural expression across the globe. This course explores the sociocultural factors that shape who we are as humans, our behavior, and perceptions. We
will examine some of the social categories and institutions that have profound influences on
the lives of human beings (e.g. families, economies, political systems, religions), as well as the categories of expression (e.g. language, symbolism, medicine, ecology), and processes of contemporary cultural change around the world.
Questions? Email Tamara Dixon at tmdixon2@buffalo.edu

 

APY107: INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
July 11—August 19, 2016
Mondays and Wednesdays 6:30pm-9:40pm
Humans have always sought to understand where we came from, why we are the way we are, and where we fit amongst the animal kingdom. Physical anthropology—the study of human evolution and origins—attempts to answer these questions, looking at our past and contemporary non-human primates for clues. This course will trace our human origins, from the earliest possible fossil hominins, looking at variations and adaptations that ultimately led to modern humans. We will discuss evolutionary theory and genetics, the fossil record, contemporary non-human primates, and human adaptations, applying these ideas to help us understand our place in the world.
Questions? Email Tamara Dixon at tmdixon2@buffalo.edu

 

APY108: INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY
May 31—July 8, 2016
Mondays and Wednesdays 9:00am-12:10pm
Archaeology is a field of study focused on understanding the human past from the material remains preserved and uncovered in modern times. In this course, we will explore the world and human diversity throughout time, find out how archaeologists interpret the past using artifacts, sites, and human remains, discover the greatest archaeological finds of all time, and learn to decipher fact from fiction in popular portrayals of past societies. This introduction to the field of archaeology will bring to life the fascinating study of ancient cultures, in a short but dynamic six-week summer course.
Questions? Email Tamara Dixon at tmdixon2@buffalo.edu

Anthropology Majors: Fulfill Your Intro Course Requirements This Summer!
Non-Anthropology Majors: Consider These Classes For Your General Education Social Science Requirement!

 

Wednesday
04/06/16

Summer 2016 Art Courses Open To All Students

Posted by Tim on April 6, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements, Summer Courses

UB DEPARTMENT OF ART SUMMER 2016 COURSES:

1ST SESSION J- MAY 31 – JULY 8

ART HISTORY COURSES

Course Title Instruction Day/Time/Room Course # Instructor
AHI 102LR J LEC REC Survey Italian Renaissance to Contemporary Online real time & recorded Mon Weds 1:00- 3:00PM 11418/11963 Jamie  Di Sarno
AHI 103 LEC Survey of AHI: Nonwestern Art Online real time & recorded Tues Thurs

9:00- 11:00 AM

12600 Yuriko Nagatsuma

ART COURSES                                                                                                                                                                          

Course Title Instruction Day/Time/Room Course # Instructor
ART 111LAB J Drawing Fundamentals 1 Classroom Mon Weds Thurs

130- 530pm

CFA 218

11203 Alyssa Crane
ART 210LAB J Intro to Photography Classroom Tues Weds Thurs

130- 530pm

CFA 117

12388 Natalie DiIenno
ART 231LABJ Painting Non Major 1 Classroom Mon Tues Thurs

900am- 100pm

CFA 203

10627 George Hughes
ART 250LAB J Intro Digital Practices Classroom Tues Weds Thurs

900am- 100pm

CFA 136

12387 Jennifer Gradecki
ART 350 LAB J Web Design Classroom Mon Weds Thurs

130- 530pm

CFA 136

12396 Dominic Licata

3rd SESSION M- JULY 11- AUGUST 19

ART HISTORY COURSES

Course Title Instruction Day/Time/Room Course # Instructor
AHI 101LR M

LEC REC

Survey Egypt to Renaissance Online real time & recorded Mon Weds

1:00- 3:00PM

11962 Amy Baer

ART COURSES     

Course Title Instruction Day/Time/Room Course # Instructor
ART 111LABM Drawing Fundamentals 1 Classroom Mon Weds Thurs

900am- 100pm

CFA 218

10365 Caroline Doherty
ART 231LABM Painting Non Major 1 Classroom Mon Tues Thurs

130- 530pm

CFA 203

12080 Skylar Borgstrom
Tuesday
02/02/16

Spring 2016 French, Italian and Spanish Proficiency Exams

Posted by Tim on February 2, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements

Spring 2016 French, Italian and Spanish Proficiency Exams*

Wednesday, Feb 17
3:20-4:50 PM
Norton 213

Thursday, Mar 10
3:20-4:50 PM
Norton 209

For all information on the tests and to Register: http://rll.drupalgardens.com/language-learners/proficiencytest

*This is NOT a placement exam. The exam is intended for students who recently completed 3 or more years of high school French, Italian or Spanish. It tests elementary and intermediate level proficiency.

Monday
01/25/16

MUS 109: Master Composer Open Seats Spring 2016

Posted by Tim on January 25, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements

A new music course, MUS 109 Master Composer, has been added to the Spring 2016 schedule and is currently open.  This course studies the life and times of a single composer or a group of composers and will fulfill your general education arts requirement.  Taught by Prof. Yuki Numata Resnick, Assistant Professor of Violin and Viola, this course promises to be current and fascinating.

An active performer, reviews of Prof. Numata Resnick include:  A violinist with “virtuosic flair and dexterous bravery,” according to The New York Times. Yuki is rapidly gaining attention as a charismatic virtuoso, having performed as a soloist with the Knoxville Symphony, New World Symphony, the University at Buffalo’s Slee Sinfonietta, the Wordless Music Orchestra, the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra and the Eastman Philharmonia Orchestra. Yuki was invited to perform Charles Wuorinen’s Rhapsody with the Tanglewood Orchestra and at the composer’s request and as a last minute replacement, she performed Wuorinen’s Spin Five with The Slee Sinfonietta. Highlights of the 2014-2015 season include Yuki as a featured soloist in Max Richter’s Vivaldi Recomposed at the Sydney Opera House, multiple appearances at the 2015 Big Ears Festival  and a world premiere of a solo violin piece by Jóhann Jóhannsson at the Metropolitan Art Museum.

To register:  MUS 109 NUM, Spring 2016, Reg. 24626, Tuesdays from 3:00 pm – 5:30 pm in 227 Baird Hall