University Honors College - The Honorable mention
Tuesday
11/22/16

LAI 301: Composing in the Human Sciences Spring 2017

Posted by Tim on November 22, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

LAI 301: Composing in the Human Sciences
3 Sections available Spring 2017

Also fulfills Communication Literacy 2

CL2 is designed to engage in exploring various composition processes, genres, and modalities that underlie skilled communication practices and consider larger issues of what it means to be communicatively literate in the digital, global world. We will explore a number of ways in which humans communicate in career and workplace literacies. Serves students who are studying and preparing for careers in the Human Sciences and Applied Human Sciences which may include those in academic and professional training in social work, psychology, education, media, law, industry, commerce, computing, management, health services, sociology, anthropology, and teaching. The human sciences emphasize the effects of disciplinary self-conceptions on what counts as knowledge and evidence in inquiries into
human beings and how they function together in social groups.

For more information, please contact Suzanne Miller at smiller@buffalo.edu

Wednesday
11/09/16

APY 323 Anthropology and Education Spring 2017

Posted by Tim on November 9, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

Spring 2017

APY323 Anthropology and Education

Professor Reed-Danahay

Mondays and Wednesdays 3:30 to 4:50

O’Brian 109

This course takes a global perspective on human teaching and learning in a variety of cultural contexts. We explore ethnographic methods in educational research and anthropological approaches to education in its widest sense, both in and out of schools. Such forms of socialization as apprenticeship and initiation will be placed alongside of the formal educational institutions of North American and European nations. This course will also address the educational issues facing immigrants and minority populations in contemporary societies. Issues of gender, ethnicity, and social class will be discussed. Readings and discussion will emphasize research and practice. We will work with various qualitative methods, including autoethnography, and will also explore depictions of teachers and students in both ethnographic and feature films. There are no prerequisites.

*This course fulfill the Diversity requirement in the UB Curriculum.

Monday
11/07/16

New Spring Class: MGO 463/695

Posted by Tim on November 7, 2016 in Academics, UB Curriculum

Are you registering for Spring classes?

Get 3 credits to work on your early stage business idea, plus a chance to win $5,000 in eLab

MGO463/695

ELab is a 3-credit course that gives you the opportunity to evaluate a business idea and the skills to develop and manage a successful new venture. You will learn every step of the startup process and benefit from regular guest lecturers. Class speakers include entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, consultants and business lawyers.

Past students have also met with 43North competition winners, Z80 Labs tech incubator entrepreneurs and attended a WNY Venture Association meeting. The eLab course is one of the best ways to prepare for the Panasci Entrepreneurship Competition, a campus-wide business idea competition offering a $25,000 first-place prize. Student teams will also compete for a fellowship of at least $5,000 at the end of the class.

The class is open to undergraduate and graduate students in any department.

More information and application link can be found here.

Wednesday
11/02/16

Spring Social Work undergraduate electives- open to all undergraduates

Posted by Tim on November 2, 2016 in Academics, Registration and Seminar Information, UB Curriculum

SW 401A Black Masculinities

This course concerns the exploration of Black masculinity and the various policies that shape how Black male identity is viewed in America and how those policies shape the gendered perspectives/behaviors of the Black male. Consistent with an interdisciplinary approach the course will focus on a number of domains that impact Black men such as the prison industrial complex, poverty, violence, education and draw from a number of disciplines such as social work, history and sociology. We start our consideration of this topic with an examination of the institution of slavery in America between the 17th century and the beginning of the 20th century which set the foundation for Black masculinity in America. Theories that aim to explain Black male outcomes will be incorporated throughout the course.

Wednesdays from 9 to 11:50am

319 Filmore

3 Credits

Registration #: 23191

Instructor: Christopher St. Vil

SW 401B Introduction to Black Male-Female Relationships: A Historical and Contemporary Analysis

This course will introduce students to the historical and contemporary issues facing black male-female relationships. Through this course students will use a trauma informed perspective to 1) develop an understanding of the historical and contemporary context of black male-female relationships 2) assess intervention strategies and 3) propose their own solutions for addressing these pressing issues.

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11am to 12:20pm

138 Bell Hall

3 Credits

Registration #: 23331

Instructor: Noelle St. Vil

Wednesday
11/02/16

CL205 “Heroes” Offered Spring 2017

Posted by Tim on November 2, 2016 in Academics, Registration and Seminar Information, UB Curriculum

The Department of Classics will offer three sections of one of its CL (Composition and Literacy) 2 courses in spring 2017.  The course, Classics (also abbreviated CL) 205 “Heroes,” has been a very popular offering historically, and we believe that it will continue to be a course that students will find interesting and rewarding in its new life as a CL2 offering.  The course deals with heroic figures of antiquity and the Middle Ages, such as Achilles, Beowulf, the Arthurian knights, and so on, as presented in traditional literary sources, and also in more contemporary presentations (film, television etc.).

“Heroes” is a study of the heroic figure in ancient and medieval literature, and also in modern popular culture. Readings and writings will focus on heroic figures of the Odyssey and Iliad, the Mahabharata, Beowulf, and the Arthurian Cycle,  but will also incorporate non-Indo-European traditions such as those of Gilgamesh and the Bible. Contemporary portrayals in cinema, television and graphic media will be examined as well. This course is designated a Communication and Literacy 2 course and as such entails intensive student writing. On average, no less than 1/3 of class meetings will be devoted to writing instruction. Such instruction will entail discussion of Classics disciplinary genres, the various audiences and purposes of these genres, and library/research skills, as well as time devoted to in-class peer workshops, and also instruction in disciplinary style and citation practices, evaluation and integration of secondary sources into student writing, and so on.

Tuesday
05/17/16

LAI 301: Composing in the Human Sciences Fall 2016

Posted by Tim on May 17, 2016 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

3 sections:

Tues-Thurs @ 11 AM

Tues-Thurs @ 2PM

Online Communication Literacy II

CL2 is designed to engage in exploring various composition processes, genres, and modalities that underlie skilled communication practices and consider larger issues of what it means to be communicatively literate in the digital, global world. We will explore a number of ways in which humans communicate in career and workplace literacies. Serves students who are studying and preparing for careers in the Human Sciences and Applied Human Sciences which may include those in academic and professional training in social work, psychology, education, media, law, industry, commerce, computing, management, health services, sociology, anthropology, and teaching. The human sciences emphasize the effects of disciplinary self-conceptions on what counts as knowledge and evidence in inquiries into human beings and how they function together in social groups.

For more information, please contact Suzanne Miller at smiller@buffalo.edu

Meets the undergraduate requirement for a Communication Literacy II course