University Honors College - The Honorable mention
Thursday
08/02/18

Open Seats in ENG 323: Sex and Gender with Dr. Hubbard Fall 2018

Posted by Tim on August 2, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements

ENG 323: SEX AND GENDER IN 19th CENTURY AMERICA                Fall, 2018

Professor Stacy Hubbard                                                                    M-W-F 1:00-1:50

This course examines cultural and literary aspects of sex and gender in nineteenth century America and will engage students interested in history, politics, gender, psychology and literature. Through fiction, poetry, essays, autobiographies and speeches, we will explore what it meant to be a man or a woman, “masculine” or “feminine,” and how these categories shaped the culture at large as well as individual lives. We will explore how sex and gender categories are created and regulated through laws, religious prescriptions, customs, medical practices and representations and how particular groups or individuals confirmed, challenged or altered these categories throughout the nineteenth century. Among topics we’ll explore are courtship and marriage, adultery, homosexuality, “fallenness,” sex and slavery, “Boston marriages,” Fourierism, Woman Rights, black manhood, “miscegenation,” separate spheres ideology, hysteria and neurasthenia, and masculinity and war. Along with primary works, we’ll read short selections from theoretical and historical materials by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Carol Smith-Rosenberg, and others.

Primary readings: Catherine Maria Sedgwick, A New-England Tale; Margaret Fuller, Woman in the Nineteenth Century (selections); Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Self-Reliance”; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life (selections); Walt Whitman, poems; Emily Dickinson, poems & letters; Henry James, The Bostonians; Louisa May Alcott, Behind a Mask;  Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “The Yellow Wallpaper”; Elizabeth Cady Stanton, speeches; Ida B. Wells, speeches; Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage; Charles Chesnutt, selected stories; Kate Chopin, The Awakening.

Requirements include diligent attendance and informed participation; reading quizzes; several short exercises in independent research; two 1800-2100 word essays; and a final comprehensive essay exam.