University Honors College - The Honorable mention
Monday
01/28/19

UB Now Offers Seneca and Mohawk Language Courses

Posted by Tim on January 28, 2019 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

We have officially received the green light to move forward with offering TWO Haudenosaunee Language courses at UB in the Spring 2019 semester! Please make note of the following preliminary information:

AMS 197: Introduction to Seneca Language
111 Talbert Hall, North Campus
Wednesday evenings 6pm-8:40pm

AMS 276: Languages and Cultures of Native North America – Introduction to Mohawk Language

108 Baldy, North Campus

Thursday evenings 6pm-8:40pm

Please note: You do NOT need any prior knowledge of Seneca or Mohawk language to take either of these courses. Beginners are welcome!!!

Spring Semester 2019 runs from Jan 28 – May 10.

If you are a UB student who is interested in enrolling in these courses, please do so ASAP. We need to build enrolment as quickly as possible.

These courses are also open to non-matriculating students. Non-degree seeking students (which includes High school students and community members) who want to enroll in one of these courses should follow the process set out here: https://registrar.buffalo.edu/nondegree/index.php

That includes filling in this form: http://www.gradmit.buffalo.edu/etw/ets/et.asp?nxappid=GRA&nxmid=GetApplication&appprog=3ST0MCTF8

Please email me at tm59@buffalo.edu if you have any questions. I will be sure to pass on any necessary updates.

Monday
01/28/19

FR 481 Global Literary Experiments in the Other Arts: A Photrographic Approach Spring 2019 Open Seats

Posted by Tim on January 28, 2019 in General Education Requirements, Honors Experiences, Registration and Seminar Information

The photographic image has undoubtedly been a decisive artifact in the construction of modern life. Today, we take more pictures and see the results faster than ever, given the technology that most people with a cellphone have access to. But why do we love taking pictures? Why is the “selfie” so ubiquitous? What are we after? Has that changed since photography’s beginning, not so long ago, in the mid-19th century?

The word “photography” was invented by resorting to Greek, linking light, “photos,” and writing, “graphein,” suggesting that this practice of recording images on a surface is a way of writing with light. This form of writing has developed a productive dialogue with literature, as a longstanding creative practice of writing that draws on reality and language… and their uncanny underside. Feeding on literature’s special potential to express unacknowledged dreams, psychoanalysis has provided a vocabulary to consider that enigmatic underside, where words and images exceed conscious will and established discourses. This course considers the relations photography maintains with perception, signification, time, history, pleasure, desire, sexuality, and political agency, among other factors. Such an investigation will take us forward: to interrogate the sense and effects of current and future photographic practices, from everyday Instagram smartphone shots to photojournalism, to photography in contemporary art galleries. And it also takes us back: to 19th-century Paris as a starting point, where photography finds important roots with inventors Daguerre and Niépce, and where a certain medical practice that involved photography, namely, Dr. Charcot’s experiments and theories of hysteria, led to the invention of psychoanalysis, a field that gave rise to the concept of the unconscious in ways highly relevant, in turn, to experimental photography and literature. And further back… to fairy tales Charles Perrault introduced to the literary cannon at the end of the 17th century, which still intrigue us today (Blanche Neige/Snow White, for instance). The trajectories of photography, psychoanalysis, and literature are therefore intertwined in rich ways that we explore in this course. How, for instance, does photography transform literary works? And what do literature and psychoanalysis reveal to users of photographic images about themselves, or about the bodies and world they see through photography? Can photographs make visible what remains unacknowledged, unthought, yet shaping our reality? These are questions that certain photographers and writers actively explored, drawing on plastic experiments, psychoanalytic theory, and on the unique knowledge that literary works can give access to. The discussion remains open for you (and your camera) to join. *French majors and minors (or readers of French) are strongly encouraged to read in French whenever possible.

Thursday
08/02/18

Open Seats in ENG 323: Sex and Gender with Dr. Hubbard Fall 2018

Posted by Tim on August 2, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements

ENG 323: SEX AND GENDER IN 19th CENTURY AMERICA                Fall, 2018

Professor Stacy Hubbard                                                                    M-W-F 1:00-1:50

This course examines cultural and literary aspects of sex and gender in nineteenth century America and will engage students interested in history, politics, gender, psychology and literature. Through fiction, poetry, essays, autobiographies and speeches, we will explore what it meant to be a man or a woman, “masculine” or “feminine,” and how these categories shaped the culture at large as well as individual lives. We will explore how sex and gender categories are created and regulated through laws, religious prescriptions, customs, medical practices and representations and how particular groups or individuals confirmed, challenged or altered these categories throughout the nineteenth century. Among topics we’ll explore are courtship and marriage, adultery, homosexuality, “fallenness,” sex and slavery, “Boston marriages,” Fourierism, Woman Rights, black manhood, “miscegenation,” separate spheres ideology, hysteria and neurasthenia, and masculinity and war. Along with primary works, we’ll read short selections from theoretical and historical materials by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Carol Smith-Rosenberg, and others.

Primary readings: Catherine Maria Sedgwick, A New-England Tale; Margaret Fuller, Woman in the Nineteenth Century (selections); Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Self-Reliance”; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life (selections); Walt Whitman, poems; Emily Dickinson, poems & letters; Henry James, The Bostonians; Louisa May Alcott, Behind a Mask;  Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “The Yellow Wallpaper”; Elizabeth Cady Stanton, speeches; Ida B. Wells, speeches; Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage; Charles Chesnutt, selected stories; Kate Chopin, The Awakening.

Requirements include diligent attendance and informed participation; reading quizzes; several short exercises in independent research; two 1800-2100 word essays; and a final comprehensive essay exam.

Thursday
05/24/18

ENG 397: Digital/Broadcast Journalism Fall 2018

Posted by Tim on May 24, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements, New Programs

ENG 397: Digital/Broadcast Journalism

Topic: Podcasting

Podcasts have become one of the most popular forms of media with over 48 million weekly listeners, according to Edison research.

To capitalize on that opportunity, this class, offered in fall 2018, will introduce students to the art of creating podcasts with relevant technology, developing journalistic content for a podcast series, and build an audience by creating a marketing/brand strategy in a hands-on production class.

The class will also offer regular listening assignments and reading on the latest research in podcasting.

Course reg #: 24290

Meetings: Tuesdays 4-6:40 p.m.

134C Greiner Hall

Instructor: Carl Lam

Tuesday
05/15/18

New Sociology Classes Open for Enrollment Summer and Fall 2018

Posted by Tim on May 15, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

The Sociology Department has recently opened some new summer and fall courses for enrollment:

Summer II:

SOC 349, Classical Soc Theory (Class # 12785)

MWF 9-10:50AM

Summer III:

SOC 101, Online Intro to Soc (Class #12854)

Fall:

SOC 293, Social Research Methods (Class #24707)

MWF 10-10:50AM

SOC 311, Drugs and Society (Class #24706)

MWF 12-12:50PM

Monday
05/07/18

Interested in Activism/Community Organizing and Development? Social Work Offering Two Classes This Fall!

Posted by Tim on May 7, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

Interested in activism/community organizing and development? Be a part of the solution! Learn how to help residents build strong communities that are safe, secure, and just. The School of Social Work is offering two classes this fall (and more in the spring, to be announced) that are open to all undergraduate students and majors.

SW 220 Introduction to Community Organizing and Development
M/W, 10-11:20am, 112 Talbert Hall, North Campus
Registration #24465

This course provides a general introduction to the history, organizations, strategies, and practice issues related to community organizing and development. Specifically, this course examines different types of community organizing and development approaches including, but not limited to workforce development, neighborhood revitalization, and arts and culture. Current trends and strategies for organizing residents and collaborating with community-based organizations on development initiatives are explored. This course also introduces empowerment, strengths-based, human rights, and trauma-informed perspectives as frameworks for developing, exploring, and analyzing community organizing and development efforts in urban and rural settings.

SW 309 Developing Leadership in Communities

M/W, 6-7:25pm, 250 Park Hall, North Campus

Registration #23986

This course focuses on development of leadership skills and strategies that foster community engagement and strengthen the natural leadership of residents within communities. Students will examine theories of leadership and the ways in which they influence organizational structures that promote community well-being. Central to this course is the acquisition of strategies that can be used to enhance the development of skills as well as the exercise of leadership by community residents. Likewise, they will explore the mechanisms that support opportunities for collaboration across social, political, legal, and financial systems and the communication patterns that influence success.

For questions about whether these courses will count towards your university requirements, please speak to your advisor.

Wednesday
03/21/18

SOC 434: Topics in Urban & Public Policy-Urban Schools and Communities Fall 2018

Posted by Tim on March 21, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements, Honors Experiences

SOC 434: Topics in Urban & Public Policy-Urban Schools and Communities Fall 2018
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9:30-10:50 a.m.
Capen 109

In the United States, a child’s home address is one of the major factors determining the quality of schooling that s/he will receive. WHY?

In this new course, students will examine the relationship between urban public schools in the U.S. and the neighborhoods and communities in which they are located. Topics include:
-Why are many schools so segregated on the basis of race and class? Why does
segregation matter?
-How does neighborhood violence influence children’s performance in school?
-How are residential segregation and school segregation related?
-What factors determine where families choose to live and where they choose to send
their children to school?
-How have government policies and practices concerning neighborhood and community
development affected schools over time?
-How have some cities tried to desegregate their schools? What has worked? What
hasn’t worked?
-What does it mean to say that a neighborhood is “gentrifying”? How does that affect
the neighborhood’s schools?
-What is the “school-to-prison pipeline”?
This course may be used to satisfy advanced course requirements in the following SSC concentrations:
-Urban & Public Policy
-Health & Human Services – Early Childhood
-Health & Human Services – Community Mental Health

Wednesday
01/10/18

Additional Art Classes with Open Seats Spring 2018

Posted by Tim on January 10, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

The Department of Art has added the classes below to the Spring 2018 schedule and are open for registration.  All of these classes are appropriate for non- art majors and are for beginners.

We would love to have students from all majors in these classes so please join us.

ART 111 Drawing Fundamentals

Tues/Thurs  7:00-9:30PM

This course investigates concepts and practices of drawing from observation, memory and imagination, while building individual skills and awareness of composition, expression and visual communication. Projects utilize a wide variety of media and demand intense observation, processes, research, creativity and critical thinking. There is a lab fee assigned to this course.

ART 231 Painting for Non-Majors

Mon/Weds 3:15-5:45PM

This course is for students who are not committed to becoming artists.  We learn a basic approach to oil painting and experience a variety of visual points of view.

There is a lab fee associated with this class.

ART 250 Digital Art

Mon/Weds 7:00-9:30PM

Surveys, in hands-on fashion, the rich and unique resources the computer offers the artisit/designer.  Includes computer basics, letter manipulation, drawing and painting metaphors, image processing, 3-D modeling, sound/image synthesis, interactive scripting and animation.  There is a lab fee associated with this course.

ART 259 Intro to Screen Print

Mon/Weds 3:15-5:45

In this printmaking process the artisit first applies a stenicl to mesh screren and uses a squeegee to push ink through the screen to the surface below.  Screen print is a relatively fast and non-toxic means for printing color images onto a wide range ot surfaces.  There is a lab fee associted with this course.

Wednesday
01/10/18

Online Art History Courses Spring 2018

Posted by Tim on January 10, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

Art History courses now ONLINE for the Spring 2018 semester.  No experience is necessary for either class and there are open seats for registration.

Give one of the classes a try, you might discover a new area of interest.

AHI 258  Impressionism and Post Impressionism

French art from 1860-1900; Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas, Seurat, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Toulouse-Lautrec, and Cezanne; the aesthetic nature of their works and the connection to contemporary literary, political, philosophical, and scientific developments. Impact of impressionism and postimpressionism on the art of the twentieth century.

AHI 203 Latin American Ar

This introductory course will focus on the intersection of aesthetics, politics, and history, and explore key themes in the art of Latin America. We will look at art spanning from the Pre-Colombian era through colonialism, struggles for independence, art during dictatorships, and end with globalization and contemporary art in Latin America. We will have the opportunity to look at critical and aesthetic theories from this region and investigate, with a critical eye, who has written its histories and how they have been constructed. The issues and influence of colonialism, imperialism, capitalism, globalization, race, class, and gender will be at the forefront of our discussions. No previous knowledge of the region or of art history and theory is necessary.

Saturday
09/02/17

New Global Film Minor

Posted by Tim on September 2, 2017 in Academics, General Education Requirements, New Programs, UB Curriculum

  • The Global Film Minor in the Department of English offers UB undergraduates the opportunity to discover vibrant cinematic traditions and innovations from around the globe. There is no requirement that Global Film minors be English majors; our minors come from all departments across UB.
  • Courses in this minor will introduce students to audiovisual analysis, artistic forms, and cultural practices in a range of countries, and novel forms of cinematic storytelling. Students will gauge the impact of new and emerging technologies on contemporary cinema and explore developments in international film production, reception, exhibition, and distribution.
  • The Minor will also provide students with a unique perspective on contemporary social and political issues, such as immigration, gender and sexuality, disability, human rights, and climate change. An understanding of global issues and exposure to different cultures through the medium of film will strengthen students’ intercultural communication competence and enhance their ability to participate in our increasingly networked world, thus facilitating the development of their careers in the international marketplace.
  • The minor consists of two required courses at the 200 level (6 credits) and four courses (12 credits) at the 300-400 level. Students may also take one course in film production to fulfill the upper division credits for the minor (see the list below).

ENG: 256 Film; 378 National Cinemas; 379 Film Genres; 381 Film Directors (Buffalo Film Seminar); 382 & 384 Shakespeare in Film 1 and 2; 440 Film Theory; 441 Contemporary Cinema; 442 Modernism and Film

DMS: 213 Immigration and Film; 305/306 Film Analysis; 333 World Cinema; 341 Intermediate Video; 388 Screenwriting; 403/404 Advanced Documentary Production; 405/406 Ethnographic Film and Media; 409 & 410 Non Fiction Film; 441/442 Advanced Video Production​

RLL: FR 341 Topics in French Film; ITA 429 Italian Cinema; SPA 408 History of Spanish Cinema; SPA 435 Mexican Cinema; ITA 430 Italian Directors; SPA 221 Spanish Conversation through Film

TNS: AAS 253 Blacks in Film 1; AAS 254 Blacks in Film 2; AAS 417 Black Aesthetics

For more information, please contact the Global Film Minor Coordinator, Assistant Professor Tanya Shilina-Conte at tshilina@buffalo.edu or the English Undergraduate Secretary, Nicole Lazaro at nmlazaro@buffalo.edu