University Honors College - The Honorable mention
Friday
10/16/20

Spring 2021 Open Course AMS 325: Afro Caribbean Religions with Honors Faculty Fellow Craig Centrie

Posted by Tim on October 16, 2020 in Academics, General Education Requirements

Contemporary Afro Caribbean Religions. AMS 325

Registration no. 24335

Time: 2:20 to 3:40

Course Description:  Contemporary Afro-Caribbean Religions is a multi-disciplinary course drawing on the paradigms of social sciences and humanities to explore the function of religion in society.  The course familiarizes students with the syncretic religions of the Caribbean and Latin America, the role they play in society, and how religion provides a world-view and understanding of the universe.  We will explore how historical experiences form complex belief systems to help participants live and understand their daily lives.  We further examine why traditions continue to play an important role in people’s cultural lives even when the original historical conditions for their creation no longer exist. Finally, this course also examines traditional societies versus contemporary modern and technologically advanced societies, their philosophical and social underpinnings, and the extent to which social values contribute to a culture, functioning for or against its members. 

Friday
09/18/20

Student Engagement New Certificate Program: UB SELECT

Posted by Tim on September 18, 2020 in Academics, General Education Requirements, Honors Experiences, New Programs

About UB SELECT

UB SELECT stands for “Student Engagement and Leadership Education Credential Training”.

This program is designed to help students get resume-worthy experience to build skills and competencies that students can apply in their courses and future careers. Through this program, students will work with a Student Engagement Ambassador to choose from a variety of opportunities, classes, and other programs. 

A More Inclusive CertificateThis new program updates the TORCH, PEAK and UBXL Certificates and introduces two new certificates: Community and Civic Engagement and SOUL [Student Organizations Understanding Leadership] for a broader extra-curricular experience. Students previously enrolled in these certificates will still be able to complete them with their original requirements.
Additional Information and Sign Up
Monday
08/24/20

MUS 220 Break on Through

Posted by Tim on August 24, 2020 in Academics, General Education Requirements

Break on Through (MUS 220) a new course offering this Fall!

Tuesday and Thursday 3:10-5:10pm, 250 Baird

Prof. Dr. Tiffany Du Mouchelle

Unlock the doors to creativity and artistry.  In this safe environment, students use sound work, body work, visualization practices, and other creative experimentation, students learn to break through inhibitions and fears, and develop a stronger sense of their personal artistic identity. Exercises strengthen self awareness, focus, and intention, helping students feel more at ease on and off the stage. In addition to group exercises, students will have the opportunity to share, develop, and present their own creative work. This class is designed to support performance artists of all genres.  

In this course you will:

Develop awareness of your physical and mental habits, releasing restrictive patterns in exchange for practices that strengthen and nurture your creativity, self-esteem, and artistic identity. 

Develop artistic and professional materials that align with your creative and personal goals. 

Become more confident to create and present creative work. 

Friday
06/12/20

New Media Study Course: Participatory Media Art

Posted by Tim on June 12, 2020 in Academics, General Education Requirements

“Participatory Media Art” 

DMS 417 – Special Topics Course 

Fall 2020 

Course Overview

What is participation and media in our digital age? 

In “Participatory Media Art” students will focus on the history, theories, ethics, and aesthetics of participatory media art. Drawing from terms such as “social practice” or “community based art,” students will learn about participatory practices across media platforms. With a special emphasis on community engagement and design, students learn from a broad range of disciplines including sociology, history, critical theory, public health, media studies, and theatre. In doing so, we’ll explore how media can be participatory and interactive for social change. Through rigorous reading, writing, and discussion of academic articles and case studies, students will pose critical questions on participatory media art together. Topics explored include media representation, HIV/AIDS, incarceration, institutional critique, gender justice, and others. In addition, the course employs a practice-based component through workshops and in the creation of final participatory media projects, including a collective “syllabus take-over” in the last quarter of the course. Through multiple dimensions, students in “Participatory Media Art” learn about the possibilities of participation, community, and media critical for our digital age.

About the Professor 

Margaret Rhee is a poet, scholar,and new media artist. Her participatory media projects includes The Kimchi Poetry Machine (Electronic Literature Collection) and From the Center, a decade long project of feminist digital storytelling and HIV/AIDS education in the San Francisco Jail. For this project, she was awarded the Chancellor’s Award for Public Service and a Honorable Mention for the Yamashita Prize for Social Change. As a poet and scholar, she has published widely. She received her Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in ethnic studies with a designated emphasis in new media studies. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Media Study at SUNY Buffalo where she co-leads Palah Light Lab, a creative space that fosters poetry, participation, and pedagogy through technology and equity.​

Thursday
08/08/19

New Fall CL2 Course: ENG 204 Writing About the Environment

Posted by Tim on August 8, 2019 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

ENG 204 Writing about the Environment

Prof. Elizabeth Mazzolini

TR 8-9:20am

This course will explore kinds of writing related to environmentalist expression and action, both activist and professional. Students will develop a rhetorical understanding of what makes various forms of communication effective, to be able to produce their own environmentalist communication and respond to that of others. We will consider film representations of responses to climate change, and analyze visual culture’s capacity to induce social change. Finally, students will produce a paper in a genre and on a topic of their own choosing. Engaging and effective writing is possible for anyone willing and able to devote work and attention to it; good writing about the environment is the result of curiosity, research, passion, and logical, critical thinking based on trustworthy evidence and expertise. These are the principles on which the class is based.

Monday
01/28/19

UB Now Offers Seneca and Mohawk Language Courses

Posted by Tim on January 28, 2019 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

We have officially received the green light to move forward with offering TWO Haudenosaunee Language courses at UB in the Spring 2019 semester! Please make note of the following preliminary information:

AMS 197: Introduction to Seneca Language
111 Talbert Hall, North Campus
Wednesday evenings 6pm-8:40pm

AMS 276: Languages and Cultures of Native North America – Introduction to Mohawk Language

108 Baldy, North Campus

Thursday evenings 6pm-8:40pm

Please note: You do NOT need any prior knowledge of Seneca or Mohawk language to take either of these courses. Beginners are welcome!!!

Spring Semester 2019 runs from Jan 28 – May 10.

If you are a UB student who is interested in enrolling in these courses, please do so ASAP. We need to build enrolment as quickly as possible.

These courses are also open to non-matriculating students. Non-degree seeking students (which includes High school students and community members) who want to enroll in one of these courses should follow the process set out here: https://registrar.buffalo.edu/nondegree/index.php

That includes filling in this form: http://www.gradmit.buffalo.edu/etw/ets/et.asp?nxappid=GRA&nxmid=GetApplication&appprog=3ST0MCTF8

Please email me at tm59@buffalo.edu if you have any questions. I will be sure to pass on any necessary updates.

Monday
01/28/19

FR 481 Global Literary Experiments in the Other Arts: A Photrographic Approach Spring 2019 Open Seats

Posted by Tim on January 28, 2019 in General Education Requirements, Honors Experiences, Registration and Seminar Information

The photographic image has undoubtedly been a decisive artifact in the construction of modern life. Today, we take more pictures and see the results faster than ever, given the technology that most people with a cellphone have access to. But why do we love taking pictures? Why is the “selfie” so ubiquitous? What are we after? Has that changed since photography’s beginning, not so long ago, in the mid-19th century?

The word “photography” was invented by resorting to Greek, linking light, “photos,” and writing, “graphein,” suggesting that this practice of recording images on a surface is a way of writing with light. This form of writing has developed a productive dialogue with literature, as a longstanding creative practice of writing that draws on reality and language… and their uncanny underside. Feeding on literature’s special potential to express unacknowledged dreams, psychoanalysis has provided a vocabulary to consider that enigmatic underside, where words and images exceed conscious will and established discourses. This course considers the relations photography maintains with perception, signification, time, history, pleasure, desire, sexuality, and political agency, among other factors. Such an investigation will take us forward: to interrogate the sense and effects of current and future photographic practices, from everyday Instagram smartphone shots to photojournalism, to photography in contemporary art galleries. And it also takes us back: to 19th-century Paris as a starting point, where photography finds important roots with inventors Daguerre and Niépce, and where a certain medical practice that involved photography, namely, Dr. Charcot’s experiments and theories of hysteria, led to the invention of psychoanalysis, a field that gave rise to the concept of the unconscious in ways highly relevant, in turn, to experimental photography and literature. And further back… to fairy tales Charles Perrault introduced to the literary cannon at the end of the 17th century, which still intrigue us today (Blanche Neige/Snow White, for instance). The trajectories of photography, psychoanalysis, and literature are therefore intertwined in rich ways that we explore in this course. How, for instance, does photography transform literary works? And what do literature and psychoanalysis reveal to users of photographic images about themselves, or about the bodies and world they see through photography? Can photographs make visible what remains unacknowledged, unthought, yet shaping our reality? These are questions that certain photographers and writers actively explored, drawing on plastic experiments, psychoanalytic theory, and on the unique knowledge that literary works can give access to. The discussion remains open for you (and your camera) to join. *French majors and minors (or readers of French) are strongly encouraged to read in French whenever possible.

Thursday
08/02/18

Open Seats in ENG 323: Sex and Gender with Dr. Hubbard Fall 2018

Posted by Tim on August 2, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements

ENG 323: SEX AND GENDER IN 19th CENTURY AMERICA                Fall, 2018

Professor Stacy Hubbard                                                                    M-W-F 1:00-1:50

This course examines cultural and literary aspects of sex and gender in nineteenth century America and will engage students interested in history, politics, gender, psychology and literature. Through fiction, poetry, essays, autobiographies and speeches, we will explore what it meant to be a man or a woman, “masculine” or “feminine,” and how these categories shaped the culture at large as well as individual lives. We will explore how sex and gender categories are created and regulated through laws, religious prescriptions, customs, medical practices and representations and how particular groups or individuals confirmed, challenged or altered these categories throughout the nineteenth century. Among topics we’ll explore are courtship and marriage, adultery, homosexuality, “fallenness,” sex and slavery, “Boston marriages,” Fourierism, Woman Rights, black manhood, “miscegenation,” separate spheres ideology, hysteria and neurasthenia, and masculinity and war. Along with primary works, we’ll read short selections from theoretical and historical materials by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, Carol Smith-Rosenberg, and others.

Primary readings: Catherine Maria Sedgwick, A New-England Tale; Margaret Fuller, Woman in the Nineteenth Century (selections); Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Self-Reliance”; Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl; Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life (selections); Walt Whitman, poems; Emily Dickinson, poems & letters; Henry James, The Bostonians; Louisa May Alcott, Behind a Mask;  Charlotte Perkins Gilman, “The Yellow Wallpaper”; Elizabeth Cady Stanton, speeches; Ida B. Wells, speeches; Stephen Crane, The Red Badge of Courage; Charles Chesnutt, selected stories; Kate Chopin, The Awakening.

Requirements include diligent attendance and informed participation; reading quizzes; several short exercises in independent research; two 1800-2100 word essays; and a final comprehensive essay exam.

Thursday
05/24/18

ENG 397: Digital/Broadcast Journalism Fall 2018

Posted by Tim on May 24, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements, New Programs

ENG 397: Digital/Broadcast Journalism

Topic: Podcasting

Podcasts have become one of the most popular forms of media with over 48 million weekly listeners, according to Edison research.

To capitalize on that opportunity, this class, offered in fall 2018, will introduce students to the art of creating podcasts with relevant technology, developing journalistic content for a podcast series, and build an audience by creating a marketing/brand strategy in a hands-on production class.

The class will also offer regular listening assignments and reading on the latest research in podcasting.

Course reg #: 24290

Meetings: Tuesdays 4-6:40 p.m.

134C Greiner Hall

Instructor: Carl Lam

Tuesday
05/15/18

New Sociology Classes Open for Enrollment Summer and Fall 2018

Posted by Tim on May 15, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements, UB Curriculum

The Sociology Department has recently opened some new summer and fall courses for enrollment:

Summer II:

SOC 349, Classical Soc Theory (Class # 12785)

MWF 9-10:50AM

Summer III:

SOC 101, Online Intro to Soc (Class #12854)

Fall:

SOC 293, Social Research Methods (Class #24707)

MWF 10-10:50AM

SOC 311, Drugs and Society (Class #24706)

MWF 12-12:50PM