University Honors College - The Honorable mention
Monday
10/28/19

Neuroscience BS, Info Session: November 19, 2019

Posted by Tim on October 28, 2019 in Academic Presentations, Academics, New Programs

What is Neuroscience?

  • How does the brain work to control our everyday interactions with our environment? And what happens when things go wrong?
  • UB’s interdisciplinary neuroscience program utilizes a molecules-to-behavior approach to answer these questions.
  • Examine neuroscience at the level of individual genes, cells, organs, neural circuits and animal/human behavior.

Any students interested in more information on the new neuroscience major or how to pursue it should plan to attend our informational session.

Tuesday, November 19th from 3:00-4:00pm in Capen 107.

This is a great opportunity to learn more about the curriculum and opportunities available with this exciting new degree program.

If you are unable to attend please email Shannon Brown smbrown3@buffalo.edu

Friday
10/18/19

Spring 2020 Course Offerings & New Minor From the School of Social Work

Posted by Tim on October 18, 2019 in Academics, New Programs

The School of Social Work is offering a new minor in Community Organizing and Development.

The School of Social Work is also offering several spring Social Work undergraduate-level electives, open to all majors and non-degree students. Register as normal, but if you have questions about a course, please email them at swinfo@buffalo.edu.

SW 140 Organizing and Advocacy #21843, Monday, Wednesday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m., Location TDB

This course focuses on the nuts and bolts of organizing and the strategies that inform advocacy with an emphasis on the roles social capital has on networking effectively across groups and systems. Because the skills and tasks of organizing and advocacy are predominately to catalyze and agitate for change, students will examine relevant policies and learn how to identify and map the distribution of power they promote particularly as they influence access to services and support in neighborhoods and communities. With an understanding of power and its impact on community capacity building, students will explore and engage in opportunities to apply cross-cultural communication in traditional media and public speaking. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 150 Social Media in Social Change, #21844, Tuesday, Thursday 6:00 p.m. to 7:20 p.m., Location TBD

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with social media and social networking as they influence community change. Specifically, students will be introduced to the fundamental terms and concepts of social media and networking, including various interfaces, tools, and platforms that may be leveraged to promote community change and development. Students will also explore existing scholarship and best practices, as well as issues of social justice, burdens of adversity, social disadvantage, and human rights as they apply to the democratization of technology. Students will examine the challenges, opportunities, and future applications of social media and networking related to community change. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 230 Theories and Policies of Community Organizing and Development (Hybrid), #23952, Tuesday, Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m., Fillmore 325, North Campus

This course provides students with an understanding of the ways in which the history of community organizing and development informs community theory and policy across urban and rural settings. With an emphasis on group development theory, students will be introduced to the major theories and policies that impact neighborhood/community capacity, including but not limited to theories of poverty, inequality, human rights, urban and rural community organizing and development, and neighborhood organizing. A particular focus is the intersection of these theories and policies within this framework that can create social capital and foster entrepreneurship, social innovation, and cross-sector collaboration. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 235 Responses to Child Maltreatment, #21841, Monday, Wednesday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m, Clemen 106 North Campus

This course focuses on interdisciplinary system responses to child maltreatment, including trauma-informed and human rights-based approaches. The course explores responses across multiple community systems, including child welfare agencies, health care systems, law enforcement, and schools. This course is designed for, but not limited to, students who are interested in public health, social work, human services, nursing and other health professions, sociology, psychology, law, and education. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 245 Global Child Advocacy Issues, #21842, Tuesday, Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m., 351 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus

This course is designed to increase student understanding of the adverse experiences of children growing up in various countries. The purpose of this course is to expose students to considerations of socioeconomics, health, culture, religion, and politics and how these affect the welfare and well-being of children across the world. This course examines advocacy efforts using a trauma-informed, human rights framework. (3 cr. hr.)

SW309LEC Developing Leadership in Communities, # 23953, Monday/Wednesday 6pm-7:20pm, Talbot 106, North Campus

Description: This course focuses on development of leadership skills and strategies that foster community engagement and strengthen the natural leadership of residents within neighborhoods and communities. Students will examine theories of leadership and the ways in which they influence organizational structures that promote community well-being. Central to this course is the acquisition and application of strategies that can be used to enhance the development of skills as well as the exercise of leadership by neighborhood and community resident. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 401 Black Masculinities (Undergraduate and Graduate) # 23572 (UNG), #24048 (GRAD) Wed, 9-11:50am Obrien 210, North Campus

This course concerns the exploration of Black masculinity and the various policies that shape how Black male identity is viewed in America and how those policies shape the gendered perspectives/behaviors of the Black male. Consistent with an interdisciplinary approach the course will focus on a number of domains that impact Black men such as the prison industrial complex, poverty, violence, education and draw from a number of disciplines such as social work, history and sociology. We start our consideration of this topic with an examination of the institution of slavery in America between the 17th century and the beginning of the 20th century which set the foundation for Black masculinity in America. Theories that aim to explain Black male outcomes will be incorporated throughout the course. (3 cr. hr.)

SW101 Human Biology, online, #22209

This course will provide a foundational understanding of human biology with emphasis on the biological bases of behaviors and issues of concern to social workers. This course is designed to meet the human biology prerequisites for Masters in Social Work students, and will cover the basics of human biology including anatomical systems and structures, development from conception through aging and death; genetics, evolution, and biological and environmental interactions. The focus of the course is not only on biology but also on the critical analysis of the interplay between human biology and social issues. Discussions will cover the biological bases of phenomena including but not limited to addictions, mental illness, sexuality, and aggression. Emphasis throughout the course also will be placed on biological processes related to trauma and stress.

Wednesday
10/02/19

New Course – ES 352 Sports Nutrition for Coaches – Spring 2020

Posted by Tim on October 2, 2019 in Academics, New Programs

Exercise Science will be offering a new course in Spring 2020 titled: ES 352 Sports Nutrition for Coaches.  This is a 3 credit course that will be offered online. The course is open to any student with a  junior or senior standingwho has completed the following prerequisites: NTR 108 Human Nutritionand NTR 109 Nutrition in Practice.  This course is well-suited to students who are currently coaching sports teams or planning to become sport coaches in the future. The course will also benefit student athletes who would like to gain a better understanding of how nutrition affects sport performance.

Course description:  The best technical instruction, coaching methods and conditioning regimens are beneficial only if an athlete’s body is properly fueled and able to operate at peak efficiency. This course will provide scientific-based nutrition information and nutritional advice that coaches and athletes need in order to improve and maintain optimal performance. This course presents nutritional concepts tailored for application by advanced athletics in any sport.

Wednesday
08/14/19

New Minor in Nonprofit Leadership

Posted by Tim on August 14, 2019 in Academics, New Programs

The Social Sciences Interdisciplinary program (IDP) is pleased to offer a new Minor in Nonprofit Leadership, open to all UB undergraduates!

The Minor in Nonprofit Leadership provides students with an understanding of how nonprofit organizations differ from corporations and government entities in their structure and function, as well as exposure to practical skills (e.g., development, grantwriting, program evaluation) and topics related to working in nonprofit organizations. The minor is ideal for students who are interested in social or public service, who care about advancing a cause, or who want to have a social or civic impact on their communities. Students may use a limited number of approved courses from multiple UB departments to fulfill the minor, making it an excellent complement to a wide range of undergraduate majors.

The minor consists of 18 credit hours, including two required courses (SSC 103 and SSC 235) and a variety of elective options. Interested students are encouraged to review the program requirements. Questions may be directed to the IDP office in 203 Clemens or at 716-645-2245 x0.

Monday
08/05/19

New Minor in Addiction Studies

Posted by Tim on August 5, 2019 in Academics, New Programs

The Minor in Addiction Studies is unique in drawing from experts from many different disciplines—medical, humanities, legal, social sciences, and more—to provide multi-perspective training in addiction and related issues. The program is designed for students whose interests and career goals involve addiction at any level.

https://arts-sciences.buffalo.edu/psychology/undergraduate/minor-addiction-studies.html

Wednesday
07/10/19

Native American Courses Offered Fall 2019

Posted by Tim on July 10, 2019 in Academics, New Programs

For students interested in language learning while fulfilling some of their Gen Ed, Diversity, and UB Curriculum-Global Pathway requirements, why not consider learning about the languages of the original Indigenous peoples of this region! The Department of Transnational Studies is currently offering TWO Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Language courses at UB in the Fall 2019 semester! Please make note of the following course information:

AMS 100: Indian Image on Film

Tuesdays 4:10pm-6:50pm

Fulfills Arts, Humanities, Civilization & History and Diversity Learning UB Pathway areas and is in Three UB Curriculum Thematic Pathways

Instructor: Professor Demchak

AMS 179: Introduction to Native American History

Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:00pm-3:20pm

Surveys divers experiences of Indigenous peopls of North America from ancient societies to the present day.

Instructor: Professor Grinde

AMS 197: Introduction to Seneca Language

248 Cooke Hall, North Campus

Wednesday evenings 6pm-8:40pm

Instructor: Jacky Snyder

AMS 276: Languages and Cultures of Native North America – Introduction to Mohawk Language

248 Cooke Hall, North Campus

Thursday evenings 6pm-8:40pm

Fulfills Humanities, Language and Social Sciences ares in the pathways and is in the Global Cultures and Expressions pathway area.

Instructor: Jodi L Maracle 

AMS 281: Native Americans & the Colonial Problem

Mondays and Wednesdays 3:30pm-4:50pm

Fulfills Humanities and Diversity Learning UB Pathway areas and is in three UB Curriculum Thematic Pathways

Instructor: Professor Mt. Pleasant

AMS 301: Introduction to Native American Women

Tuesdays and Thursdays 12 noon-1:20pm

Fulfills Humanities, Civilization and History, and Diversity Learning UB Pathway areas and is in two UB Curriculum Thematic Pathways

Instructor: Professor T. McCarthy

Wednesday
07/10/19

New Sustainability Class and Advanced Certificate

Posted by Tim on July 10, 2019 in Academics, New Programs

SSC433 SEM: Sustainability and American Culture

Craig Thomas, PhD, MLA, MFA

Tues/Thurs 2-3:20PM: Baldy 110

How have the social sciences (sociology, anthropology, politics, economics, and public policy) and the humanities (literature, religion, history, film, critical theory, ethics, philosophy and educational theory) shaped, and been shaped by, the growing field of sustainability? How do these disciplines integrate with the natural sciences to help solve complex sustainability problems today? This class features guest speakers, field trips and historical and contemporary work by important American authors, artists, thinkers and educators who continue to influence our understanding and application of knowledge in sustainability discourse.

*Graduate Students: Students will be able to apply this course as graduate credit for the Advanced Sustainability Certificate and can apply for consideration to other graduate programs.

**Undergraduates: This course can satisfy requirements for both tracks of an Environmental Studies Major (Both Environmental Education and Policy; Environmental Resources and Management Tracks)

Monday
04/15/19

Child Advocacy Studies Micro-Credential Fall Course Elective

Posted by Tim on April 15, 2019 in Academics, New Programs

Are you interested in working with children or families?

Child maltreatment remains a devastating and prevalent experience for children in the United States and around the globe. The Child Advocacy Studies Micro-Credential (CAST) classes are open to students from any major and are intended to prepare students in their future careers to recognize and respond to child maltreatment. They may be taken as a set, culminating in a digital badge, or as stand-alone courses (except for SW 235). These courses are geared towards students who plan on any career that involves working with children or families, including nursing, education, human services, medicine, law, psychology, or many other fields.

The courses are:

·         SW 225: Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Advocacy

                           Offered Fall 2019, M/W, 10:00 -11:20 AM | #22740

·         SW 235: Professional and System Responses to Child Maltreatment*

                          *Requires completion of SW 225

                            Offered Spring 2020

·         SW 245: Global Child Advocacy Issues

                           Offered Spring 2020

For more information, please contact UB’s School of Social Work Assistant Professor Patricia Logan-Greene at (716) 645-1533 or PBLOGANG@BUFFALO.EDU. Visit the website for additional details.

Thursday
05/24/18

ENG 397: Digital/Broadcast Journalism Fall 2018

Posted by Tim on May 24, 2018 in Academics, General Education Requirements, New Programs

ENG 397: Digital/Broadcast Journalism

Topic: Podcasting

Podcasts have become one of the most popular forms of media with over 48 million weekly listeners, according to Edison research.

To capitalize on that opportunity, this class, offered in fall 2018, will introduce students to the art of creating podcasts with relevant technology, developing journalistic content for a podcast series, and build an audience by creating a marketing/brand strategy in a hands-on production class.

The class will also offer regular listening assignments and reading on the latest research in podcasting.

Course reg #: 24290

Meetings: Tuesdays 4-6:40 p.m.

134C Greiner Hall

Instructor: Carl Lam

Friday
05/04/18

Open Dance Classes – Fall 2018

Posted by Tim on May 4, 2018 in New Programs

OPEN DANCE CLASSES—FALL 2018

The following dance technique courses are open to all undergraduate students at UB.

Students who need assistance registering should email kamallin@buffalo.edu

DAC 116: Ballet Technique 1

MWF 9:00-9:50

Registration number: 22745

A studio course that introduces ballet technique.

DAC 118: Jazz Technique 1

T/TH 3:30-4:50

Registration number: 22747

A studio course that introduces jazz technique.

DAC 119 : World Dance Styles

T/TH 3:30-4:50

Registration number: 24263

Explores

DAC 126: Ballet Technique 2

M/W 12:00-1:20

Registration number: 24504

Beginner/Intermediate Level for students with some prior experience.

Students who have not taken DAC 116, but who have previous dance training experience may request instructor permission to enroll. Please contact the department for more information.