University Honors College - The Honorable mention
Friday
10/18/19

Spring 2020 Course Offerings & New Minor From the School of Social Work

Posted by Tim on October 18, 2019 in Academics, New Programs

The School of Social Work is offering a new minor in Community Organizing and Development.

The School of Social Work is also offering several spring Social Work undergraduate-level electives, open to all majors and non-degree students. Register as normal, but if you have questions about a course, please email them at swinfo@buffalo.edu.

SW 140 Organizing and Advocacy #21843, Monday, Wednesday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m., Location TDB

This course focuses on the nuts and bolts of organizing and the strategies that inform advocacy with an emphasis on the roles social capital has on networking effectively across groups and systems. Because the skills and tasks of organizing and advocacy are predominately to catalyze and agitate for change, students will examine relevant policies and learn how to identify and map the distribution of power they promote particularly as they influence access to services and support in neighborhoods and communities. With an understanding of power and its impact on community capacity building, students will explore and engage in opportunities to apply cross-cultural communication in traditional media and public speaking. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 150 Social Media in Social Change, #21844, Tuesday, Thursday 6:00 p.m. to 7:20 p.m., Location TBD

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with social media and social networking as they influence community change. Specifically, students will be introduced to the fundamental terms and concepts of social media and networking, including various interfaces, tools, and platforms that may be leveraged to promote community change and development. Students will also explore existing scholarship and best practices, as well as issues of social justice, burdens of adversity, social disadvantage, and human rights as they apply to the democratization of technology. Students will examine the challenges, opportunities, and future applications of social media and networking related to community change. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 230 Theories and Policies of Community Organizing and Development (Hybrid), #23952, Tuesday, Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m., Fillmore 325, North Campus

This course provides students with an understanding of the ways in which the history of community organizing and development informs community theory and policy across urban and rural settings. With an emphasis on group development theory, students will be introduced to the major theories and policies that impact neighborhood/community capacity, including but not limited to theories of poverty, inequality, human rights, urban and rural community organizing and development, and neighborhood organizing. A particular focus is the intersection of these theories and policies within this framework that can create social capital and foster entrepreneurship, social innovation, and cross-sector collaboration. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 235 Responses to Child Maltreatment, #21841, Monday, Wednesday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m, Clemen 106 North Campus

This course focuses on interdisciplinary system responses to child maltreatment, including trauma-informed and human rights-based approaches. The course explores responses across multiple community systems, including child welfare agencies, health care systems, law enforcement, and schools. This course is designed for, but not limited to, students who are interested in public health, social work, human services, nursing and other health professions, sociology, psychology, law, and education. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 245 Global Child Advocacy Issues, #21842, Tuesday, Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m., 351 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus

This course is designed to increase student understanding of the adverse experiences of children growing up in various countries. The purpose of this course is to expose students to considerations of socioeconomics, health, culture, religion, and politics and how these affect the welfare and well-being of children across the world. This course examines advocacy efforts using a trauma-informed, human rights framework. (3 cr. hr.)

SW309LEC Developing Leadership in Communities, # 23953, Monday/Wednesday 6pm-7:20pm, Talbot 106, North Campus

Description: This course focuses on development of leadership skills and strategies that foster community engagement and strengthen the natural leadership of residents within neighborhoods and communities. Students will examine theories of leadership and the ways in which they influence organizational structures that promote community well-being. Central to this course is the acquisition and application of strategies that can be used to enhance the development of skills as well as the exercise of leadership by neighborhood and community resident. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 401 Black Masculinities (Undergraduate and Graduate) # 23572 (UNG), #24048 (GRAD) Wed, 9-11:50am Obrien 210, North Campus

This course concerns the exploration of Black masculinity and the various policies that shape how Black male identity is viewed in America and how those policies shape the gendered perspectives/behaviors of the Black male. Consistent with an interdisciplinary approach the course will focus on a number of domains that impact Black men such as the prison industrial complex, poverty, violence, education and draw from a number of disciplines such as social work, history and sociology. We start our consideration of this topic with an examination of the institution of slavery in America between the 17th century and the beginning of the 20th century which set the foundation for Black masculinity in America. Theories that aim to explain Black male outcomes will be incorporated throughout the course. (3 cr. hr.)

SW101 Human Biology, online, #22209

This course will provide a foundational understanding of human biology with emphasis on the biological bases of behaviors and issues of concern to social workers. This course is designed to meet the human biology prerequisites for Masters in Social Work students, and will cover the basics of human biology including anatomical systems and structures, development from conception through aging and death; genetics, evolution, and biological and environmental interactions. The focus of the course is not only on biology but also on the critical analysis of the interplay between human biology and social issues. Discussions will cover the biological bases of phenomena including but not limited to addictions, mental illness, sexuality, and aggression. Emphasis throughout the course also will be placed on biological processes related to trauma and stress.

Friday
10/11/19

Placement in French, Italian and Spanish courses for Spring 2020

Posted by Tim on October 11, 2019 in Academics

General guidelines for placement in French, Italian and Spanish courses can be accessed at:  https://arts-sciences.buffalo.edu/romance-languages-literatures/undergraduate/intro-language-courses.html

Any student in need of information on placement in a language course in French, Italian and Spanish should fill out this form:  https://arts-sciences.buffalo.edu/romance-languages-literatures/undergraduate/intro-language-courses/placement-form.html

Responses will be given to those placement requests within 24-48 working hours as long as students fill the form with as much detail as possible, not leaving out any information on their experience.  

Monday
10/07/19

Spring 2020 Honors Seminar: Dreams of the New in Postwar France (Open to All Majors)

Posted by Tim on October 7, 2019 in Academics, Honors Experiences, Honors Seminars

FR 481: Dreams of the new in Postwar France
Wednesdays 4-6:40 p.m.
Room TBA…will be on north campus and likely in a seminar room
Professor Fernanda Negrete
Open to all majors….no prerequisites!
Registration #: 23546

A number of French writers, thinkers, and artists after World War II proposed radical notions of the new. They decided that the only way to revive language, space, and time, after these key elements of symbolic life had collapsed under the traumatic events of the Holocaust, was to begin creative work at “degree zero”: by starting without the guidelines and standards left behind by cultural traditions in a world that had fallen apart. In other words, these French authors, through experimental fiction, theory, cinema, and theater confront the destruction of the collective and of its very stage to ask what it means to think and write, to make an artwork, or to build and inhabit a city after it has been shattered by human acts of violence.

To think “the new” also entails asking what it means to remember, dream, and repeat. In colloquial speech we talk about “our dreams” as our great wishes and projects for the future. For its part, Freudian dream theory —where dreams refer to the productions we carry out in our sleep— claims that a dream is the fulfillment of a wish. But what happens when the future “our dreams” envision has been shattered? What kinds of wishes are left? And how do we understand nightmares here? Freud himself asked this question by thinking of (WWI) war veterans’ insistent nightmares, and discovered an important function of repetition in the unconscious, which is especially relevant when the work of remembering faces the obstacle of trauma. This unique sense of unconscious repetition was key for both psychoanalysis and the French authors who developed New Wave cinema, the New Novel, “writing degree zero,” as well as other new conceptions of community (Freud, Agamben, Nancy, Blanchot, Guattari, Oury and Guattari) and the subject of unconscious desire.

This seminar will involve discussions in different formats (roundtable, small groups) around texts, films, plays, viewings, invited lectures. Evaluation will be based on consistent attendance and participation supported by preparation, and on mid-term and final papers (5-6 pages for the midterm, 9-10 pages for the final).

Monday
10/07/19

Summer Internship to Peru for Outstanding Minority Undergrad and MA students

Posted by Tim on October 7, 2019 in Academics, Honors Experiences, Internships, Networking, Study Abroad

MHIRT Introduction

The San Diego State University Minority Health and Health Disparities International Research Training program (SDSU MHIRT) is a component of the national MHIRT program funded by the National Institutes of Health. We provide international training experiences to students from health disparity backgrounds with a goal of encouraging such students to pursue careers in biomedical, clinical, and behavioral health research. The ultimate mission of the MHIRT program is for MHIRT trainee alumni, through their careers as researchers and medical professionals, to work to reduce, and eventually eliminate, healthcare disparities in the United States.

The SDSU MHIRT Program is always interested in receiving applications from exceptional candidates. In addition to meeting the below criteria, we are looking for applicants with a high level of emotional maturity, professionalism, and dedication to improving the research and outcomes of populations affected by health disparities post matriculation. To be eligible for the MHIRT program you must, at minimum, meet the following criteria: You must be a US citizen or permanent resident.

  • You must come from an NIH specified minority group underrepresented in biomedical research. (Please visit our Program Overview page for more information).
  • You must have a GPA of 3.0 or higher.
  • Undergraduate applicants must have junior or senior class standing at your institution. Previous undergraduate research experience is highly recommended.
  • Master’s students must have previous research experience in the area of our MHIRT training programs.
  • You must show a commitment to pursuing a career in research, public health, or another field, focused on health disparities.
Monday
10/07/19

Spring 2020 Honors Seminar TH 425-Media and Performance Seminar (Open to ALL Majors)

Posted by Tim on October 7, 2019 in Academics, Honors Experiences, Honors Seminars

TH 425-Media and Performance Seminar
Professor Lindsay Hunter
Registration #: 301130
Mondays and Wednesdays 3-4:20 p.m.
188 Alumni Arena

Course description: This course will consider various forms of mediated and intermedial performance in order to examine the particular habits, possibilities and affinities of performance in mediatized contexts.  Possible areas of focus include television and televisual performance, intermedial theatre, and performance in video gaming and in online contexts. 

For Spring 2020, we will consider the ways representational media’s power to dissemble and intersects with the theatrical urge toward enacting the artificial to produce the phenomenon of hoaxing, in which a constructed falsehood masquerades as true and actual. Though the concerns of this course are perhaps best demonstrated by the contemporary phenomenon of “deepfakes”—that is, video doctored by artificial intelligence so that it appears to document happenings that never occurred—the use of representational media to present the fraudulent as real is hardly new. Victorian spirit photography, allegations of faked moon landings, and purposefully misleading journalism all point to the facility media possess, even in a pre-digital era, to enact misrepresentation on a large scale. The easy manipulability of digital media, however, certainly brings concerns about hoaxing, fraudulence, and representational dishonesty into new territory, requiring us to refine our critical perspectives: what separates the hoax from mere untruth or disingenuousness, or from the artifice and illusion of theatre?  In an effort to better parse the unique possibilities and affordances of the hoax, we will investigate its performative nature—that is, its manifesting in the world through enactment—as well as the ways deception and representation collude in the hoax’s constitutive acts.

Monday
10/07/19

Spring 2020 Honors College Seminar Opportunity: CSE 410-Algorithms Have Arrived. What’s next? Open to ALL Majors

Posted by Tim on October 7, 2019 in Academics, Honors Experiences, Honors Seminars

Consider taking an Honors seminar this spring! There are three courses offered and they are all open to ANY major and there are NO Prerequisites for these courses for Honors scholars.

CSE 410: Algorithms have arrived. What’s Next?
registration #: Please contact Tim Matthews for registration into this course at trm7@buffalo.edu
Professor Atri Rudra
214 Norton Hall

Algorithms make decisions in all parts of our lives, starting from the mundane (e.g. Netflix recommending us movies/TV shows), to the somewhat more relevant (e.g. algorithms deciding which ads Google shows you) to the downright worrisome (e.g. algorithms deciding the risk of a person who is arrested committing a crime in the future). Whether we like it or not, algorithms are here to stay: the economic benefit of automation provided by algorithms means companies and even governments will continue to use algorithms to make decisions that shape our lives. While the benefits of using algorithm to make such decisions can be obvious, these algorithm sometimes have unintended/unforeseen harmful effects.

This class will look into various algorithms in use in real life and go into depth of both the societal as well as technical issues. For students who are more technologically inclined, the hope is that this course will open their eyes to societal implications of technology that such students might create in the future (and at the very least see why claiming “But algorithms/math cannot be biased” is at best a cop-out). For students who are more interested in the societal implications of algorithms, the hope is that this class will give them a better understanding of the technical/mathematical underpinnings of these algorithms (because if you do not understand, at some non-trivial level, how these algorithms work you cannot accurately judge the societal impacts of an algorithm).

Overall the hope is that students who will build the technology of the future will be equipped to grapple with societal implications of their work (note that we are not saying that folks building technology need to be activists but when presented with two viable technical options they would pick one that has more societal benefits) and students who will be the future decision-makers can make more informed decisions on how algorithms can impact others (note that we are not saying that decision makers should create algorithm themselves but they should be able to understand how algorithms interacts with real life data).

Pre-requisites: Section A1 (which is for CSE majors) has a pre-requisite of CSE 331 OR CSE 474. Section A2 (which is meant for non-CSE majors) has no formal pre-requisites (besides being a junior in their major). For both sections, willingness to think beyond your usual boxes and openness to unfamiliar ideas will be crucial.

Tentative Logistics


The main graded component for the students will be a project that the students will be working on over the semester. The students will form groups of size 2-3 (depending on class size) and explore application of algorithms on some segment of society. Ideally, the group should not have everyone from the same school. The students are expected to come up an impact of the chosen algorithm in the said segment of society that has either not been studied before or has received little attention (either in popular media or academic research). The group is supposed to identify a potential research question that can be investigated further (some initial suggestions will be provided). The mini project will have three main components: (1) a written report, (2) a YouTube video and (3) a demo of a prototype. The students will submit a preliminary version of the report by the middle of the semester so that they can get feedback from the instructor that they can use towards their final report, video and prototype. Tentatively, the final report should be up to 10 pages and the video up to 10 minutes long. Each group will also meet with the instructor every week for a short (<= 10 mins) update on their progress in the last week. This is to ensure that the groups are making sufficient progress as the semester moves along.

Students in Section A1 are expected to be the main contributors in their group of building the prototype while students in Section A2 will be the primary contributors in their group to looking into the societal implications of their project. Students in two sections will be graded differently on the prototype based on their primary contributions.

Every week, the class will focus on one segment of society (e.g. criminal justice system or human resources (i.e. hiring)) and discuss the impact of algorithms on that segment of society OR will talk about a stage in the algorithm development pipeline. Students will be expected to participate in the in-class discussion. Whenever possible, we will have domain experts (e.g. someone from law school talking about the criminal justice system) come and talk during the week.

Depending on the class size, the last week (or two) will be used to screen the videos  that various student groups have submitted and the groups will answer any question or address any comments/thoughts that the class might have. All this feedback will be incorporated in the final report and prototype, which will be due in the finals week. We will use the final exam time for demo of the prototypes.

Any followup Questions?

If you would like to know more about this course, please stop by for Atri’s Honors College office hours from 2-3:20pm on Thursdays in Capen 106C. If that does not work, please feel free to email atri@buffalo.edu

Wednesday
10/02/19

New Course – ES 352 Sports Nutrition for Coaches – Spring 2020

Posted by Tim on October 2, 2019 in Academics, New Programs

Exercise Science will be offering a new course in Spring 2020 titled: ES 352 Sports Nutrition for Coaches.  This is a 3 credit course that will be offered online. The course is open to any student with a  junior or senior standingwho has completed the following prerequisites: NTR 108 Human Nutritionand NTR 109 Nutrition in Practice.  This course is well-suited to students who are currently coaching sports teams or planning to become sport coaches in the future. The course will also benefit student athletes who would like to gain a better understanding of how nutrition affects sport performance.

Course description:  The best technical instruction, coaching methods and conditioning regimens are beneficial only if an athlete’s body is properly fueled and able to operate at peak efficiency. This course will provide scientific-based nutrition information and nutritional advice that coaches and athletes need in order to improve and maintain optimal performance. This course presents nutritional concepts tailored for application by advanced athletics in any sport.

Tuesday
10/01/19

2020-2021 Language Programs in India (Funding Available)

Posted by Tim on October 1, 2019 in Academics, Honors Experiences, Scholarship Opportunities, Study Abroad

The American Institute of Indian Studies welcomes applications for its summer 2020 and academic year 2020-2021 language programs. Programs to be offered include Hindi (Jaipur), Bengali (Kolkata), Punjabi (Chandigarh), Tamil (Madurai); Marathi (Pune), Urdu (Lucknow), Telugu (Hyderabad), Gujarati (Ahmedabad), Kannada (Mysore), Malayalam (Thiruvananthapuram), Mughal Persian (Lucknow), Sanskrit (Pune) and Pali/Prakrit (Pune). We will offer other Indian languages upon request. For summer Hindi we require the equivalent of one year of prior Hindi study. For summer Urdu, we require the equivalent of one year of either Hindi or Urdu. We can offer courses at all levels, including beginning, in other Indian languages for the summer. Summer students should apply for FLAS or other funding if available at their institutions to cover the costs of the program. Funding for Bengali, Hindi, Punjabi and Urdu is available through the U.S. State Department’s CLS program (see www.clscholarship.org). AIIS has some funding available for summer students who cannot procure their own funding. This funding is allocated on the basis of the language committee’s ranking of the applicants. AIIS will award language fellowships, on a competitive basis, to academic year and fall semester students, which would cover all expenses for the program. Those eligible for these fellowships are U.S. citizens or permanent residents who will have had the equivalent of at least two years of prior language study by September 2020. AIIS offers Hindi, Bengali, Tamil, Urdu and other languages at all levels for the fall and academic year although fellowships would only be available for students who will have had the equivalent of two years of prior language study by the beginning of the program.AIIS will offer funding to masters students to complete a capstone project of their choosing upon completion of the summer program. The application deadline is December 31, 2019. Applications can be downloaded from the AIIS web site at www.indiastudies.org. For more information: Phone: 773-702-8638. Email: aiis@uchicago.edu.

Wednesday
09/18/19

United Kingdom: UB Semester in London Spring 2020 Program Information Session – September 18, 2019

Posted by Tim on September 18, 2019 in Academics, Internships, Study Abroad

The United Kingdom: UB Semester in London Spring 2020 Program offers 2-3 Sociology courses (SOC 467, SOC 358, SOC 499 –optional) AND 6 credits of an internship! There will be an information session TODAY (Wednesday, September 18) from 5-6pm in NSC 216. All are welcome to attend!

Wednesday
09/18/19

Fall 2019 Management Major Information Sessions

Posted by Tim on September 18, 2019 in Academics, Event

If you have strong quantitative abilities and an eye for the business world, a major in Accounting or Business Administration could be for you! Attend one of our fall information sessions for additional information both majors as well as the business administration concentrations, and how to apply to change your major.

Sessions will be held in Alfiero 205 on:

  • Thursday, September 26 at 11 a.m. – Noon
  • Friday, September 27 at 10 – 11 a.m.
  • Tuesday, October 29, 10 – 11 a.m. ** This session will also include information about our BS Information Technology and Management Major
  • Wednesday, October 30 at 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.
  • Friday, November 1 at 11 a.m. – Noon
  • Monday, November 4 at 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. ** This session will includes speaker from the College of Arts and Sciences to discuss majors that also lead to careers in business.
  • Thursday, November 7 at 10 – 11 a.m. ** This session will includes speaker from the College of Arts and Sciences to discuss majors that also lead to careers in business
  • Thursday, November 14 at 11 a.m. – Noon ** This session will also include information about our BS Information Technology and Management Major
  • Friday, November 15 at 10:30 – 11:30 a.m.