University Honors College - The Honorable mention
Monday
12/02/19

Summer Study Abroad to Costa Rica Focusing on Health Promotion

Posted by Tim on December 2, 2019 in Academics, Honors Experiences, Study Abroad

This course will begin by comparing the United States and Costa Rica health care system. Costa Rica, a middle-income Latin American country, rivals those of the U.S. in many health indicators while spending much less. The Costa Rican system focuses on health promotion and primary care to improve the health of vulnerable and needy population groups resulting in improved health for all. During this experience, students will explore various public health topics, including the difference in lifestyle in multiple areas around the country, health disparities between different ethnic groups, and how environmental health impacts human health. Various public health topics such as child health, substance use, mental health, and diet and lifestyle will be explored during different experiences and in-country lectures. 

For more information please contact: Jessica S. Kruger, Ph.D., CHES at jskruger@buffalo.edu

Clinical Assistant Professor

Department of Community Health and Health Behavior

School of Public Health and Health Professions

Tuesday
11/26/19

END 488: Making a Campus Forest open to Junior and Senior Undergraduates Spring 2020

Posted by Tim on November 26, 2019 in Academics, Community Announcements, Honors Experiences, Workshops

Project description

The UB North Campus consists of a massive platform-megastructure surrounded by turf-grass, parking lots, and roads. Could UB do better? The UB Faculty Senate and Professional Staff Senate have established committees to find ways of improving our campus environment.

The committee’s objective this year is afforestation: the establishment of vital forest ecosystems on the campus. We are searching for:

·        precedents

·        investigating practical feasibility

·        considering alternative forestry plans

·        educating the UB community about our effort with articles or artworks

·        seeking funding by which UB can start

·        examining alternatives to surface parking

·        researching other related options

Would you like to join us? Junior and senior undergrads (END 488) and grad students (END 588/URP 588) are eligible with permission of the instructor – https://forms.gle/fSpB5g8hrnPtYpHbA.

END 488/END 588/URP 588 – MAKING A CAMPUS FOREST is a three-credit seminar/practicum, with heavy emphasis on individual or group work.  During some weeks, students will hear from specialist guests, undertake individual research or creative projects, and present results to each other and to members of the Faculty Senate and Professional Staff committees. (This year we will not actually be planting trees, sorry.) Some weeks we will not meet in class but rather have one-on-one of small-group meetings on your projects.  Students may be required to upload their projects onto their UB ePortfolio and to strive to earn digital badges where possible.

Project outcome

Through ongoing consultation with the instructor, you will prepare an intellectual product in service of campus afforestation planning. Generally, you will be expected to submit successive versions of your product, leading to ever higher quality. The product may be:

·        research paper on methods of forest restoration

·        an essay on forest literature and symbolism

·        a study of other college campus policies

·        a review of charitable foundations that support forestry

·        a study of SUNY-wide policies

·        a series of articles meant for newspaper or online publication

·        outcomes in the form of performance or public speaking

·        landscape-related art or  architecture relying heavily on living vegetation

·        curation of an exhibit 

If your proposed project is very much outside the instructor’s area of knowledge, he may accept it upon on the condition that you and he can identify and involve an additional mentor.

Project details

Timing, eligibility and other details
Length of commitment Spring 2020
Start time Spring (with start of classes in Spring 2020)
Level of collaboration Individual projects and/or group projects of 2-3 students
Benefits Academic credit 
Who is eligible Juniors and Seniors
Support Funding is available after the completion of the preparation badge. See below.

Core partners

·        Faculty Senate Committee on Campus Environment 

·        Professional Staff Senate Sustainability Committee

Project mentor Ernest Sternberg Professor and Associate Dean School of Architecture and Planning 126 Hayes Hall Phone: (716) 829-3671 Email: ezs@buffalo.edu https://forms.gle/fSpB5g8hrnPtYpHbA   Project administrator R.J. Multari Assistant Dean and Adjunct Assistant Professor School of Architecture and Planning 126 Hayes Hall Phone: (716) 829-3671 Email: ap-undergrad@buffalo.edu https://forms.gle/fSpB5g8hrnPtYpHbA    

 Preparation

To engage with this project, you will work through a series of Project-Based Collaboration digital badges to guide your experience. These badges will:

1.      Guide you in setting your goals and intentions as well as gaining additional context,

2.      Enhance your collaboration with your mentor/partner,

3.      Support your reflection and help you integrate your learning with your academic and professional goals.

All students who wish to participate in a project on the Project Portal must first complete the Project Preparation Digital Badge. First, contact the project mentor to discuss availability – https://forms.gle/fSpB5g8hrnPtYpHbA  – and after you’ve received approval, you can start the Project Preparation Digital Badge.


Friday
11/22/19

Fulbright UK Summer Institutes – Freshmen and Sophomores with 3.7+ GPA

Posted by Tim on November 22, 2019 in Academics, Honors Experiences, Scholarship Opportunities, Student experience, Study Abroad, Summer Courses, Summer Research

If you are a freshman or sophomore and are interested in possibly winning a grant to study abroad in the UK this summer, read on!

The Fulbright UK Summer Institutes are three or four week programs for US undergraduate students. Participants can explore the culture, heritage and history of the UK while experiencing higher education at a UK university.

There are four summer institutes this year: 

  1. Glasgow (Technology, Innovation and Creativity)
  2. Bristol (exploring the intersection of arts, activism and social justice) 
  3. Belfast (understanding Ireland from a Northern Irish perspective)
  4. Aberystwyth (contemporary issues in Identity and Nationhood, through the lens of Wales)

The Institute costs covered by the Fulbright Commission and its partner institutions include:

·         Return US-UK airfare

·         Tuition and fees at the host institution

·         Accommodation

·         In some cases, a small daily allowance for meals

To be eligible, students must*:

·         Be a US citizen and possess a US passport

·         Have had little or no study/travel outside of the US or North America

·         Have a minimum GPA of 3.7

·         Be at least 18 years old by the start of the program

·         Be able to participate in the program in its entirety

·         Have at least two years of undergraduate study remaining after the Institute finishes

The deadline is February 11th, so this is something you’re interested in, you’ll want to start working on now. If you are interested in applying, drop me an email. 

See fuller descriptions of the programs here: http://www.fulbright.org.uk/going-to-the-uk/uk-summer-institutes

Friday
11/22/19

CSEP Counseling Minor New Classes Spring 2020

Posted by Tim on November 22, 2019 in Academics, Registration and Seminar Information

New Course Offerings in the Undergraduate Minor in Counseling. The
Counseling Minor is appropriate for undergraduate students who may be interested in careers in professional psychology (counseling psychology, clinical psychology, or school psychology), counseling (school counseling, rehabilitation counseling, mental health counseling), or related fields such as social work or nursing.
For more information on the Counseling Minor please visit:
gse.buffalo.edu/programs/cminor

This Spring, we are offering several new courses designed to provide a more in depth view into several counseling and psychology fields.

New courses:
CEP 411: Current Issues in School Counseling (Parisi) registration number is 24252
CEP 411: Current Issues in Counseling Psychology (Mack) registration number is 24253
CEP 411: Current Issues in Mental Health Counseling (Guyker) registration number is
22325
CEP 411: Introduction to Mindfulness (Guyker) registrar number is 23537
CEP 440: Introduction to School Psychology (Tulledge) registration number is 22602
In addition, several other courses are also available:
CEP 400: Introduction to Educational Psychology registration number is 24251
CEP 404: Introduction to Rehabilitation and Substance Abuse registration number is
17395
CEP 453: Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling registration number is 19321

Friday
11/08/19

University of Tennessee Summer Undergraduate Research Education Experiences in the Environmental Health Sciences

Posted by Tim on November 8, 2019 in Academics, Honors Experiences, Networking, Research Information and Opportunities, Summer Research, Workshops

The University of Tennessee Summer Undergraduate Research Education Experiences in the Environmental Health Sciences provides students an opportunity to explore their interests in the environmental health-related aspects of biology, microbiology, and the biomedical sciences through hands-on summer research opportunities. Students will uniquely experience the breadth and depth of research that occurs at a major research institution. 

Program Description
The University of Tennessee’s Center for Environmental Biotechnology, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering, and Office of Undergraduate Research have partnered to provide a ten-week summer research education experience program designed to immerse and challenge undergraduate students in the science, technology, engineering, mathematical, and medical science (STEMM) disciplines. Students will be placed into faculty mentor labs for rigorous hands-on independent research with complementary training in experimental design, ethics, statistical analysis, laboratory management, entrepreneurship, and science communication.

Program Highlights
• 10-week research experience in the lab of a University of Tennessee faculty member
• Weekly seminar series on current research topics
• Special seminars on applying to and surviving in graduate school
• Professional development in science communication
• Social trips and other fun activities

Summer 2020 Program Details
• Dates: May 26th to August 1st, 2020
• Stipend: $3,700 plus housing and travel to and from Knoxville, Tennessee
• Additional information and an online application are available at: http://ugradresearchexp.utk.edu/

Program Eligibility
Undergraduate students majoring in biology, microbiology, biochemistry, biomedical engineering, environmental engineering, or other biotechnology-related areas, other physical sciences, science education, or public policy who have a strong desire to complete a Ph.D. Students must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents enrolled in accredited colleges or universities.

Program Contact
Dr. Steven Ripp The University of Tennessee
676 Dabney Hall Knoxville, TN 37996 E-mail: UT.NIH.UndergraduateResearch@utk.edu Phone: 865-974-9605
Funding for this program is provided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

Application deadline: March 10th, 2020

Monday
10/28/19

Neuroscience BS, Info Session: November 19, 2019

Posted by Tim on October 28, 2019 in Academic Presentations, Academics, New Programs

What is Neuroscience?

  • How does the brain work to control our everyday interactions with our environment? And what happens when things go wrong?
  • UB’s interdisciplinary neuroscience program utilizes a molecules-to-behavior approach to answer these questions.
  • Examine neuroscience at the level of individual genes, cells, organs, neural circuits and animal/human behavior.

Any students interested in more information on the new neuroscience major or how to pursue it should plan to attend our informational session.

Tuesday, November 19th from 3:00-4:00pm in Capen 107.

This is a great opportunity to learn more about the curriculum and opportunities available with this exciting new degree program.

If you are unable to attend please email Shannon Brown smbrown3@buffalo.edu

Friday
10/25/19

Student Success Strategies Workshop Series & Peer Coaching

Posted by Tim on October 25, 2019 in Academic Presentations, Academics, Tutoring, Workshops

The Student Success Strategies Series and Peer Coaching Network opportunities are now open to NEW FRESHMAN (whether or not they were marked “at-risk” in a UB Seminar or ENG105 class).

  • Deal effectively with any potential barriers or challenges to making a smooth transition to college
  • Develop and strengthen behaviors, skills and strategies that will help you move confidently toward academic success
  • Connect with experienced UB students* who can share how they learned to be successful
  • Ensure yourself a greater chance for success and achievement of your personal and academic goals

Weekly workshops will be held in the Greiner Hall B Wing classrooms:

Week 2: Time Management
Tues. 10/22 6:00-7:30 pm
Wed. 10/23 7:00-8:30 pm

Week 3: Self-Care
Tues. 10/29 6:00-7:30 pm
Wed. 10/30 7:00-8:30 pm

Week 4: Class & Course Skills
Tues. 11/5 6:00-7:30 pm
Wed. 11/6 7:00-8:30 pm

Week 5: Study Smart
Tues. 11/12 6:00-7:30 pm
Wed. 11/13 7:00-8:30 pm

*Attend one or all of the workshop series and connect
with a Peer Success Coach. To sign up for a Coach go
to https://forms.gle/znLYWKkhtvY57Xkb9.
*For the workshops just show up! Light food will be served.
*Questions?: email studentsuccess@buffalo.edu


Friday
10/18/19

Spring 2020 Course Offerings & New Minor From the School of Social Work

Posted by Tim on October 18, 2019 in Academics, New Programs

The School of Social Work is offering a new minor in Community Organizing and Development.

The School of Social Work is also offering several spring Social Work undergraduate-level electives, open to all majors and non-degree students. Register as normal, but if you have questions about a course, please email them at swinfo@buffalo.edu.

SW 140 Organizing and Advocacy #21843, Monday, Wednesday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m., Location TDB

This course focuses on the nuts and bolts of organizing and the strategies that inform advocacy with an emphasis on the roles social capital has on networking effectively across groups and systems. Because the skills and tasks of organizing and advocacy are predominately to catalyze and agitate for change, students will examine relevant policies and learn how to identify and map the distribution of power they promote particularly as they influence access to services and support in neighborhoods and communities. With an understanding of power and its impact on community capacity building, students will explore and engage in opportunities to apply cross-cultural communication in traditional media and public speaking. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 150 Social Media in Social Change, #21844, Tuesday, Thursday 6:00 p.m. to 7:20 p.m., Location TBD

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with social media and social networking as they influence community change. Specifically, students will be introduced to the fundamental terms and concepts of social media and networking, including various interfaces, tools, and platforms that may be leveraged to promote community change and development. Students will also explore existing scholarship and best practices, as well as issues of social justice, burdens of adversity, social disadvantage, and human rights as they apply to the democratization of technology. Students will examine the challenges, opportunities, and future applications of social media and networking related to community change. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 230 Theories and Policies of Community Organizing and Development (Hybrid), #23952, Tuesday, Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m., Fillmore 325, North Campus

This course provides students with an understanding of the ways in which the history of community organizing and development informs community theory and policy across urban and rural settings. With an emphasis on group development theory, students will be introduced to the major theories and policies that impact neighborhood/community capacity, including but not limited to theories of poverty, inequality, human rights, urban and rural community organizing and development, and neighborhood organizing. A particular focus is the intersection of these theories and policies within this framework that can create social capital and foster entrepreneurship, social innovation, and cross-sector collaboration. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 235 Responses to Child Maltreatment, #21841, Monday, Wednesday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m, Clemen 106 North Campus

This course focuses on interdisciplinary system responses to child maltreatment, including trauma-informed and human rights-based approaches. The course explores responses across multiple community systems, including child welfare agencies, health care systems, law enforcement, and schools. This course is designed for, but not limited to, students who are interested in public health, social work, human services, nursing and other health professions, sociology, psychology, law, and education. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 245 Global Child Advocacy Issues, #21842, Tuesday, Thursday 10:00 a.m. to 11:20 a.m., 351 Millard Fillmore Academic Center (MFAC), North Campus

This course is designed to increase student understanding of the adverse experiences of children growing up in various countries. The purpose of this course is to expose students to considerations of socioeconomics, health, culture, religion, and politics and how these affect the welfare and well-being of children across the world. This course examines advocacy efforts using a trauma-informed, human rights framework. (3 cr. hr.)

SW309LEC Developing Leadership in Communities, # 23953, Monday/Wednesday 6pm-7:20pm, Talbot 106, North Campus

Description: This course focuses on development of leadership skills and strategies that foster community engagement and strengthen the natural leadership of residents within neighborhoods and communities. Students will examine theories of leadership and the ways in which they influence organizational structures that promote community well-being. Central to this course is the acquisition and application of strategies that can be used to enhance the development of skills as well as the exercise of leadership by neighborhood and community resident. (3 cr. hr.)

SW 401 Black Masculinities (Undergraduate and Graduate) # 23572 (UNG), #24048 (GRAD) Wed, 9-11:50am Obrien 210, North Campus

This course concerns the exploration of Black masculinity and the various policies that shape how Black male identity is viewed in America and how those policies shape the gendered perspectives/behaviors of the Black male. Consistent with an interdisciplinary approach the course will focus on a number of domains that impact Black men such as the prison industrial complex, poverty, violence, education and draw from a number of disciplines such as social work, history and sociology. We start our consideration of this topic with an examination of the institution of slavery in America between the 17th century and the beginning of the 20th century which set the foundation for Black masculinity in America. Theories that aim to explain Black male outcomes will be incorporated throughout the course. (3 cr. hr.)

SW101 Human Biology, online, #22209

This course will provide a foundational understanding of human biology with emphasis on the biological bases of behaviors and issues of concern to social workers. This course is designed to meet the human biology prerequisites for Masters in Social Work students, and will cover the basics of human biology including anatomical systems and structures, development from conception through aging and death; genetics, evolution, and biological and environmental interactions. The focus of the course is not only on biology but also on the critical analysis of the interplay between human biology and social issues. Discussions will cover the biological bases of phenomena including but not limited to addictions, mental illness, sexuality, and aggression. Emphasis throughout the course also will be placed on biological processes related to trauma and stress.

Friday
10/11/19

Placement in French, Italian and Spanish courses for Spring 2020

Posted by Tim on October 11, 2019 in Academics

General guidelines for placement in French, Italian and Spanish courses.

Any student in need of information on placement in a language course in French, Italian and Spanish should fill out the Placement Information Form.

Responses will be given to those placement requests within 24-48 working hours as long as students complete the form with as much detail as possible, not leaving out any information on their experience.  

Monday
10/07/19

Spring 2020 Honors Seminar: Dreams of the New in Postwar France (Open to All Majors)

Posted by Tim on October 7, 2019 in Academics, Honors Experiences, Honors Seminars

FR 481: Dreams of the new in Postwar France
Wednesdays 4-6:40 p.m.
Room TBA…will be on north campus and likely in a seminar room
Professor Fernanda Negrete
Open to all majors….no prerequisites!
Registration #: 23546

A number of French writers, thinkers, and artists after World War II proposed radical notions of the new. They decided that the only way to revive language, space, and time, after these key elements of symbolic life had collapsed under the traumatic events of the Holocaust, was to begin creative work at “degree zero”: by starting without the guidelines and standards left behind by cultural traditions in a world that had fallen apart. In other words, these French authors, through experimental fiction, theory, cinema, and theater confront the destruction of the collective and of its very stage to ask what it means to think and write, to make an artwork, or to build and inhabit a city after it has been shattered by human acts of violence.

To think “the new” also entails asking what it means to remember, dream, and repeat. In colloquial speech we talk about “our dreams” as our great wishes and projects for the future. For its part, Freudian dream theory —where dreams refer to the productions we carry out in our sleep— claims that a dream is the fulfillment of a wish. But what happens when the future “our dreams” envision has been shattered? What kinds of wishes are left? And how do we understand nightmares here? Freud himself asked this question by thinking of (WWI) war veterans’ insistent nightmares, and discovered an important function of repetition in the unconscious, which is especially relevant when the work of remembering faces the obstacle of trauma. This unique sense of unconscious repetition was key for both psychoanalysis and the French authors who developed New Wave cinema, the New Novel, “writing degree zero,” as well as other new conceptions of community (Freud, Agamben, Nancy, Blanchot, Guattari, Oury and Guattari) and the subject of unconscious desire.

This seminar will involve discussions in different formats (roundtable, small groups) around texts, films, plays, viewings, invited lectures. Evaluation will be based on consistent attendance and participation supported by preparation, and on mid-term and final papers (5-6 pages for the midterm, 9-10 pages for the final).